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Ranking the Falcons 2014: No. 6 Jon Asamoah

July 22nd, 2014 No comments

Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sports

Jon Asamoah

I’m counting down the top 40 players on the Atlanta Falcons, and let’s continue with sixth-ranked player: offensive guard Jon Asamoah.

To read the methodology I devised to rank the Falcons players, click here.

Total Score: 82/100

Last year’s rank: N/A
Player Grade: 70/100
Teams he is starter: 30 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 20 out of 32
Teams he is role player: 32 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +3

Of the Falcons prominent offseason additions, Asamoah is the most talented. He has the potential to immediately step into the starting lineup at right guard and become the team’s best blocker.

Asamoah comes from Kansas City where he spent the past three seasons as one of the better guards in the league. He ranked among the top 21 among premium website Pro Football Focus’ grades in each of the past three years, with 2013 being his weakest thanks in part to injuries and changes in scheme.

Asamoah missed the 2013 season-opener with a calf injury, but came back to start the next nine games for the Chiefs and played well. Then a shoulder injury in Week 11 sidelined him for the following week, and his replacement, Geoff Schwartz, played well enough that the Chiefs’ coaching staff opted to go with the “hot hand” for the remainder of the season.

But here in Atlanta, the expectations are that a now healthy Asamoah should pick up where he left off and solidify a problem spot for the Falcons at right guard.

The Falcons have featured a revolving door of ineptitude at right guard since opting to let Harvey Dahl walk in 2011. Garrett Reynolds and Joe Hawley struggled at the position that year, followed by Reynolds and Peter Konz the past two years.

Asamoah certainly will be a stabilizing force over his predecessors, and hopefully that will have positive impacts on linemates beside him in Hawley at center and right tackle Jake Matthews. Asamoah certainly offers an upgrade in pass protection, which will definitely benefit quarterback Matt Ryan.

The only concern about Asamoah is in essence how good he will be this year. Asamoah shined in the zone-blocking scheme of Kansas City over the years, using his superior mobility and athleticism to open up creases for the likes of running back Jamaal Charles. However, the Chiefs under Andy Reid last season began to gear themselves more towards a power, man-blocking scheme. That was one of the reasons why the team swapped in Schwartz, who was a much better fit in that particuar style of blocking. But even with the changes the Chiefs still managed to run a large amount of zone-blocking runs, a larger percentage than the Falcons have traditionally run over the past six seasons.

It remains to be seen if the Falcons will adapt their blocking scheme to feature Asamoah’s strengths more. At 305 pounds, Asamoah is not especially cut out to be a pile-mover at the guard position, which is what Dahl was and what the team hoped Reynolds and Konz could develop into. Such an adaptation to the scheme may also benefit left tackle Sam Baker, as well as Hawley and Matthews, who are lighter players that aren’t known for their “road-grading” abilities. Coupled with the team’s running back personnel in Jacquizz Rodgers and Devonta Freeman, quicker backs that need adequate spacing, several signs point to the Falcons utilizing more zone-blocking in 2014 and beyond. It’s just a matter of how much.

If the Falcons make that switch in blocking scheme then it’s likely that Asamoah will have equal if not greater success in Atlanta as he did in Kansas City. If not, then it shouldn’t lead to Asamoah struggling since he should still be able to impact in pass protection, but it could make him a less effective all-around player and fail to meet the lofty expectations that his high ranking merits.

Categories: Features Tags: , ,

Atlanta Falcons Training Camp Preview 2014: Interior Offensive Line

July 19th, 2014 No comments

Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports

Joe Hawley

The Atlanta Falcons finally stabilized the interior of the offensive line this offseason by signing Kansas City guard Jon Asamoah to handle right guard duties. Since the team allowed Harvey Dahl to depart via free agency three seasons ago, there has been a revolving door of one poor player after another stuck at that position.

The addition of Asamoah gives the team an accomplished player that will do well to bolster their pass protection, something that should greatly benefit quarterback Matt Ryan. If there are any issues surrounding Asamoah, it’s the run blocking that is a relatively minor concern.

Asamoah made his bones in Kansas City as a productive starter mainly with his athleticism and ability to block on the move in their zone-blocking scheme. That has not been the style of blocking the Falcons have preferred over the course of the Mike Smith Era, thus raising the question of how much, if any, adapting the Falcons will do for Asamoah.

Opposite Asamoah at left guard, Justin Blalock returns and was the team’s best blocker a year ago. But given the Falcons had one of the league’s worst lines, that might not be saying a lot.

But 2013 was one of Blalock’s better seasons as a Falcon and if he can carry that momentum in 2014, it should give the Falcons the best pair of starting guards that they’ve had in more than a decade. While Blalock has never blossomed into one of the league’s premier guards, he has become relatively consistent with above average to good play each year as he enters his eighth season in the league.

Contrasting with Blalock, there is a lot more uncertainty surrounding Joe Hawley at center. While Hawley played mostly well down the stretch as a replacement for Peter Konz at center, that does not automatically mean that given the opportunity to start every game this year will automatically translate to equal or greater success.

This summer will be an important one for Hawley, as he is getting his first legitimate chance to be the team’s long-term option at center. Initially drafted as the heir apparent to Todd McClure in 2010, Hawley was leap-frogged when the team drafted Konz in 2012.

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Atlanta Falcons Takeaways From Last Week – May 19, 2014

May 19th, 2014 Comments off
Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Jake Matthews

I really like the Jake Matthews pick.

I’m optimistic that he’s going to be one of those foundation players for the Atlanta Falcons offense for years to come. The team’s offense will be known primarily by quarterback Matt Ryan, wide receiver Julio Jones and Matthews.

The Falcons are going to need Matthews to hit the ground running as far as his transition to the NFL goes. There is a leadership void in regards to their offensive line thanks to the recent departures of center Todd McClure and offensive tackle Tyson Clabo, and Matthews will be counted upon to fill some of that void in the coming years.

And whether or not he can fill that void will depend on him playing well, and doing so relatively soon.

I have a great deal of optimism that Matthews will be a Falcon for a very long time, assuming he can stay healthy, similar to McClure, who played 14 years with the team.

Like Other Quality Tackles, Matthews Could Fly Under Radar

As I said in my scouting report of Matthews, I’m not convinced he’ll be one of the premier offensive tackles in the league but I do believe he’ll settle himself to become one of the better ones.

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Draft Needs: Should Falcons Add More Depth at Guard

April 29th, 2014 Comments off

The Atlanta Falcons stabilized their right guard position with the signing of former Kansas City Chiefs starter Jon Asamoah this offseason. There had been a revolving door at the position since the team opted to let Harvey Dahl go following the 2010 season.

Asamoah joins Justin Blalock as the most proven of the team’s five projected starters, making the interior of the line a potential strength.

But as the injury-riddled 2013 season showed, shoring up the depth at a strong position is a smart move. However, the Falcons do have some internal options.

The loser of the battle at center between Joe Hawley and Peter Konz could serve as a backup at that position. However, both Hawley and Konz were major contributors to the instability at right guard over the past three seasons since both are much more natural as centers. Moving forward, they should only be returned to the position as a last resort.

The team got solid production from Harland Gunn towards the end of last season, relative to what they saw earlier in the year. They also added Gabe Carimi this offseason, who showed promise in 2012 as a guard for the Chicago Bears. Both could prove capable fill-ins in the event of an injury, although neither are proven candidates as of yet. Gunn is a bit undersized for the position, and despite earlier promise, Carimi struggled in three starts at left guard for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2013.

The team could also move backup right tackle Mike Johnson back to guard, particularly if they wind up using a high pick on an already cluttered offensive tackle position. Johnson has spent the past two summers working at right tackle after failing to earn his way onto the field at guard his first two seasons.

So the Falcons could get by with the players currently on their roster. While solidifying guard depth may not pay immediate dividends this season, it could prove worthwhile down the road.

Blalock has a cap hit that exceeds $7 million this year as well in the final two years of his contract thereafter. He is coming off arguably his best season since joining the Falcons in 2007, but if he is unable to maintain that level of play it’s possible he could find himself playing elsewhere. The Falcons can save nearly $4 million in cap space if they cut him next offseason, and $6 million the following spring. That could be enticing savings if there is any slip in Blalock’s play. Tyson Clabo was 32 when the Falcons cut ties with him, and Blalock will turn 31 at the end of 2014.

Adding a developmental guard that could potentially be in the mix to replace Blalock down the line would be a smart move by the Falcons, in case none of the current players on the roster earn that opportunity. You could expect such a player to be found on the third day of the draft given more pressing needs at other positions.

Categories: Draft Central Tags: , , ,

FalcFans Podcast – Ep. 62 “What’s Gonna Happen with the Pass Rush?”

March 31st, 2014 Comments off

Allen and I are back to discuss some of the most intriguing moves made in free agency by the other 31 NFL teams not named the Atlanta Falcons. But before we dive deep into DeSean Jackson’s future and the horror that is the Oakland Raiders offseason, we invited the Falcoholic Dave Choate to share his thoughts on the Falcons offseason moves. Dave and I discuss whether the Falcons pass rush will be improved with the moves so far, as well as what the Falcons can do in the upcoming 2014 NFL Draft to fix that problem. We also invite Macon-area Falcon fan Dylan Hoyt to describe an interesting week that saw him embroiled with a controversy on Twitter involving wide receiver Roddy White.

Episode 62: What’s Gonna Happen with the Pass Rush? [Download]

Duration: 1 hour, 54 minutes

Allen covers the Falcons for Pro Football Spot. His twitter handle is: @Allen_Strk.

Dave writes for The Falcoholic and can be found on twitter: @TheFalcoholic.

Dylan can be found on twitter: @DHoyt77

If you have any questions and comments, you can hit us up on Twitter, post in the forums in the podcast thread, or drop an e-mail at: pudge@falcfans.com.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, and be sure to rate us there! You can also subscribe directly to our feed at the following URL: http://feeds.feedburner.com/falcfans/LXSt

Takeaways from Last Week – March 24, 2014

March 24th, 2014 Comments off
Mike DiNovo-USA TODAY Sports

Devin Hester is an Intriguing Addition in Atlanta

If I’m being honest, I like the idea of Devin Hester in an Atlanta Falcons uniform moreso than the reality.

The idea of Hester donning the black and red is giving the Falcons a legitimate playmaker on special teams, something it has lacked since the heyday of Allen Rossum nearly a decade ago. Yes, Eric Weems was my guy but his abilities as a returner was analogous to a chain-moving wide receiver as opposed to an explosive playmaker.

Hester is not quite as explosive on kickoffs as he is on punts. But anything he can contribute in the former area will be an upgrade over what the Falcons have featured the past few years. Between Weems and Jacquizz Rodgers, the Falcons have just two kickoff returns of 40 or more yards the past three seasons. Hester has nine such big-play returns in that span.

But it’s really the punts where Hester is going to impact. Partially because there’s the potential that a new rule change could further marginalize kickoffs, but also because the Falcons have had a dearth of playmaking ability on punt returns.

Weems had a single punt return of 40 or more yards in both 2010 and 2011. Those represent the only two such big punt returns since Rossum left the team after 2006. That year also coincides with the start of Hester’s NFL career with the Chicago Bears, and he’s had 19 such 40-plus yard punt returns over the past eight seasons. He’s had 11 over the past four years.

The only real issue is that the Falcons are catching Hester on the downward slope of his career. He was able to see his production rebound last year in 2013 by concentrating fully on his duties as a returner as opposed to also moonlighting as a wide receiver. But he’s a far cry from the player that he was just a few years back when he had a combined five punt return touchdowns over the 2010-11 seasons.

But as I’ve illustrated, he still represents a clear upgrade over what the Falcons have featured in recent years.

The other aspect of the idea of Hester that I like is his potential impact on offense. He’s probably not going to be a major element of the Falcons passing attack, but I do think he does represent a potential upgrade over Harry Douglas as the team’s third option.

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Takeaways From Last Week – March 17, 2014

March 17th, 2014 2 comments
John Rieger-USA TODAY Sports

Tyson Jackson

It’s not fun being so negative.

Which makes my negative reaction to the Atlanta Falcons initial free-agent moves doubly worse.

Are the Falcons a better team after signing guard Jon Asamoah, defensive tackle Paul Soliai and defensive end Tyson Jackson? Aboslutely.

Are they a significantly better team? No, not really.

At least not in some areas. Sure, they beefed up the run defense. But was the run defense that huge a need? Perhaps it’s selective memory, but outside Bobby Rainey’s Week 11 romp, I don’t recall that many instances where I felt like the defense getting the ball run down their throat.

I do remember the Falcons getting run on and run on a lot, but it never felt like it was something “out of control” to the degree to prompt swift and decisive action at the outset of the free-agent market. I think a lot of the poor run defense had more to do with the fact that they were so young at linebacker, coupled with shoddy tackling in the secondary. It seemed more like long runs were killing the Falcons, evidenced by the 28 runs of 15 or more yards they gave up last season, which was tied for the fourth-highest total allowed in the league.

Not to suggest that upgrading the run defense shouldn’t have been a priority for the Falcons, just not the priority.

I try not to be the guy that acts like the “armchair GM” that all his decisions are the right decisions. I’m very aware that I’m often wrong about things, and that there are several methods to the madness that is building successful NFL teams.

So when looking at the Falcons’ moves, I always try to see them from the team’s perspective. And if I can follow their logic and thinking, then I can usually accept, if not approve their decision-making.

So from the team’s perspective, it’s very clear they wanted to upgrade both lines. They re-signed two offensive lineman in Joe Hawley and Mike Johnson and added Asamoah. They went after defensive linemen by re-upping Corey Peters and Jonathan Babineaux while adding Soliai and Jackson.

It’s clear that the focus was on the interior of both lines, to add beef and “toughen up” the unit just like they had indicated was their plan all along. I mentioned Soliai as a potential target back in February, albeit with the expectation that he’d be a relatively cheap addition.

So on the face of things, I cannot fault the Falcons. In fact, I applaud them. They correctly identified the two biggest weaknesses of the team in both lines and addressed them with upgrades.

But once you go beyond that superficial layer, things start to fall apart.

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FalcFans Podcast – Ep. 60 “We Just Love Misery”

March 16th, 2014 Comments off

Allen and I are back to recap and review the first week of free agency in the NFL and whether or not the Atlanta Falcons’ moves to bolster the offensive and defensive lines were good or bad. We break down each move and player, indicating what we like about the decisions to bring back Joe Hawley, Jonathan Babineaux and Mike Johnson; as well as discussing the pros and cons of newcomers Jon Asamoah, Paul Soliai and Tyson Jackson. During the course of our discussion, I explain the “Hampton-Hoke Fallacy” and the negative ripple effects that can occur when teams overpay for players.

Episode 60: We Just Love Misery [Download]

Duration: 1 hour, 19 minutes

Allen covers the Falcons for Pro Football Spot. His twitter handle is: @Allen_Strk.

If you have any questions and comments, you can hit us up on Twitter, post in the forums in the podcast thread, or drop an e-mail at: pudge@falcfans.com.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, and be sure to rate us there! You can also subscribe directly to our feed at the following URL: http://feeds.feedburner.com/falcfans/LXSt

Falcons Load Up Lines to Open Free Agency

March 13th, 2014 Comments off
Robert Mayer-US PRESSWIRE

Paul Soliai

The official opening of free agency started with a bang for the Atlanta Falcons who brought in three additions and re-signed another to bolster their offensive and defensive lines. The Falcons added offensive guard Jon Asamoah and defensive end Tyson Jackson, both formerly of the Kansas City Chiefs, along with ex-Miami Dolphin defensive tackle Paul Soliai,  and re-signed center Joe Hawley.

The influence of new assistant general manager Scott Pioli was apparent with the team’s decision to sign Asamoah and Jackson. They were both drafted by Pioli during his time in Kansas City as general manager.

Asamoah signed a five-year contract worth $22.5 million, and had been rumored to be a favored target by the Falcons during the “legal tampering” period prior to Tuesday’s start of free agency. He served as the Chiefs starting right guard for most of the past three seasons, starting a combined 41 games, and will presumably play the same role in Atlanta.

Jackson was Pioli’s first-ever draft selection in Kansas City, originally selected as the third overall selection in 2009. The underwhelming start of his career earned him the “bust” label, but his improved play this past season allowed him to shed that distinction. Jackson started 45 games over five seasons with the Chiefs, with improved production the past two years as he combined for 77 tackles and seven sacks. He signed a five-year deal worth $25 million and will likely play defensive end, replacing free agent Peria Jerry in the starting lineup.

Rather than Pioli, Soliai owes his Falcon benefactor to be defensive coordinator Mike Nolan. Soliai and Nolan along with current defensive line coach Bryan Cox spent time together in Miami in 2010-11. He was another player that was linked to the Falcons prior to signing with the team. He spent seven seasons in Miami, starting the past four at nose tackle in their predominantly 3-4 defense. Soliai landed a five-year contract worth $33 million.

Hawley joins Jonathan Babineaux, Mike Johnson and Corey Peters as current Falcons that were re-signed. He signed a two-year deal worth $6 million to stay with the team. Hawley started the final seven games at center last year as a replacement for an underachieving Peter Konz.

 

Takeaways from Last Week – March 10, 2014

March 10th, 2014 Comments off
Howard Smith-USA TODAY Sports

Jon Asamoah

This weekend the NFL instituted it’s second “legal tampering” signing period, allowing free agents to begin negotiating with prospective teams before the official free agency period starts on Tuesday afternoon, March 11.

Already the Atlanta Falcons have been linked to a number of potential free agents, including guard Jon Asamoah, safety Mike Mitchell, and cornerback Champ Bailey.

But the Asamoah linkage seems strongest with multiple outside sources indicating that the Falcons interest in Asamoah is high.

While I like Asamoah quite a bit as a player, I’m not sure that he is a good fit in Atlanta. But apparently it seems like I’m in the minority in that regards.

As for Caplan’s assessment, I would have to respectfully disagree. Asamoah is a player that ideally fits in a zone-heavy blocking scheme because he’s very athletic, but not overly powerful.

The Falcons have incorporated more zone-blocking into their ground attack under offensive coordinator Dirk Koetter the past two years, but still primarily a man-blocking team.

The Falcons have made an effort to emphasize size with their line acquisitions in recent years, evidenced by additions like Terren Jones, Lamar Holmes, Phillipkeith Manley and Peter Konz the past few years since Koetter joined the team. If you’re trying to be an offense that features a lot of zone-blocking, targeting plus-sized linemen, many of whom weigh in excess of 330 pounds is largely counterintuitive.

And the lines that Mike Tice and Wade Harman coached in Chicago and Baltimore respectively emphasized size and/or man-blocking.

Could the team’s interest in Asamoah suggest a shift in their blocking? Perhaps, but more than likely the answer is no.

Read more…