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Posts Tagged ‘Bosher’

Team Needs: Falcons Could Upgrade Special Teams in Return Game

February 9th, 2014 Comments off
Daniel Shirey-US PRESSWIRE

Bosher (left) and Bryant celebrate a win

The Atlanta Falcons special teams was perhaps the only aspect of their team that consistently played at a high level in 2013. Thus there won’t be any imperative drive to try to make substantial changes this offseason.

Matt Bryant, at age 38, showed he is still kicking strong. He is entering the final year of his contract and thus the only major concern for the Falcons is thinking about his eventual replacement in 2015 and beyond. It’s doubtful that the Falcons will try to replace Bryant this year since he’s been so effective in clutch situations as well as whenever he’s kicking inside the Georgia Dome. He’s made 21 of his last 22 field goal attempts kicking at home.

But the team should at least give a long look to a young kicker in training camp just to plan ahead to 2015 when it’s possible that Bryant could decide to hang it up. The Falcons tried this strategy over a decade ago when they carried Jake Arians on the practice squad in Morten Andersen’s final season in 2000. Arians was eventually beat out by Jay Feely the following summer for the kicking job, but the strategy is still a relatively sound one. The Falcons need to start prepping for the future and that begins this offseason.

The Falcons don’t have to do such preparation at punter as Matt Bosher is blossoming into one of the better young punters in the NFL. Bosher continues to make strides both as the team’s kickoff specialist and as a punter. His big leg proved an asset several times last year when the team struggled to move the ball offensively, to help flip field position and give the Falcons’ struggling defense a fighting chance. The only real issue moving forward with Bosher is when the Falcons plan to start talking contract extension. 2014 also represents the final year on his contract, and there’s little doubt the team at some point in the next 12 months will lock him up for a lucrative long-term deal.

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2013 Year-End Superlatives: Special Teams MVP

January 15th, 2014 Comments off
Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports

Matt Bosher

Hands down the honor for most valuable Atlanta Falcons player on special teams goes to punter Matt Bosher. He was the choice made at the midpoint of the year, and had an even stronger second half of the season to solidify this honor.

Bosher showed improvement this year, showing a lot more “touch” with his punts and being able to flip field position at a moment’s notice. His kickoffs also got better, consistently forcing more touchbacks as well as the fact that he led the NFL with three successful onside kicks.

Other potential choices could have been Antone Smith, who was an outstanding gunner on those punts, helping Bosher pin teams back with his blazing speed. But simply Smith didn’t make enough plays over the second half of the season to leap frog Bosher.

Kicker Matt Bryant also had another quietly solid season, showing that he is still more than capable of making kicks at age 38. Also, cornerback Robert McClain deserves credit for he was very good punt returner over the last month of the season. His year returning punts was statistically the best year a Falcon returner has had since 2010.

Moneyball 2013 – Week 15 Review

December 17th, 2013 Comments off

After reviewing the All-22, no doubt this was an ugly win for the Atlanta Falcons over the Washington Redskins.

As I noted yesterday, the offense was fairly conservative in terms of taking deep shots down the field. It appeared that the Falcons only drew up three plays in which Matt Ryan was looking to throw the ball beyond 15 yards. I noticed how often the Falcons run plays that require the receivers to run to the sticks or a yard shy, and that’s it. There was a play-call on a 3rd-and-21 in the second quarter where it was supposed to be a clear-out for Darius Johnson. I get that with the Falcons backed up inside their 10-yard line, that Dirk Koetter didn’t want to risk Ryan taking a deep drop and increase the potential for a safety. But Johnson got no separation from David Amerson on that play and it was just a three-yard gain. That play sort of epitomizes the sort of conservative approach of the offense.

I thought Ryan did some good things, particularly in terms of his movement within the pocket to avoid pressure. There were about three times where he was able to step up in the pocket to avoid pressure and deliver a completion down the field. So much of this season I’ve watched Ryan check it down in the face of pressure, and it was nice to see him using his legs to create space and extend plays.

The only real complaint I have with Ryan in this game was his overthrow on his interception, on one of his few shots downfield at the end of the first half. I like that he was being aggressive, he just needed to make a better throw. This week will go down as one of his lower earnings of the season, but I think that had more to do with play-calling than him playing poorly.

There were problems (as usual) with the pass protection with too many breakdowns. Lamar Holmes struggled to handle Brian Orakpo, with both of his sacks allowed coming against him. Ryan Kerrigan also did good work against Ryan Schraeder on the other side with a sack and a hurry, but also was very effective when matched against our tight ends when they were blocking. I was surprised to see such a big game from defensive end Chris Baker, who got credited with a hurry (against Justin Blalock), hit (against Holmes), and pressure (against Peter Konz). He also mauled Holmes on one of the goal line runs in the second quarter where Steven Jackson got stuffed in the backfield (that was Holmes’ credited missed block). He’s a free agent after this season, so I definitely made a mental note for March.

On the bright side up front, I thought Joe Hawley had another solid game at center, and I was very impressed with Harland Gunn in his limited action on two or three series. He looked much better than Konz did at right guard. I’d say Konz probably had one of his best games of the season, but still struggled too many times. He spent a lot of time on the ground on the opening drive, and for those that don’t know, that’s not a good sign for an offensive linemen. But I’ll give Konz some credit, I think Sunday’s game was the first time he ever hit an assignment on the second level with a nice cut block on a screen pass that Jacquizz Rodgers gained 15 yards on in the third quarter.

But Gunn looked much more violent and physical, playing with better balance and footwork, and doing a better job using his hands. I really liked how quick Gunn was coming off the snap and getting to the second level. He and Hawley are two peas in the same pod, in that what they lack in power and pure strength they make up for with aggressiveness and knowing how to get position against bigger defenders. Despite not having ideal size or strength, Gunn seemed to be the only blocker that was effective at times one-on-one against Baker. That includes Blalock, who probably had his worst game of the season. He wasn’t bad by any means, but got pushed around too much in pass protection, more so than he has to date in 2013.

There isn’t much else that needs to be said about the offense. I thought Steven Jackson ran hard, and his trucking of Josh Wilson will certainly be one of the highlights of the year.

PLAYER
PASS
RUSH
REC
BLK
SPEC
PEN
TOTALS
Steven Jackson$0$9-$1$0$0-$2$6.00
Tony Gonzalez$0$0$5$1$0$0$6.00
Jacquizz Rodgers$0$2$2$0$1$0$5.00
Matt Ryan$6$0$0$0$0-$2$4.00
Harry Douglas$0$0$3$0$0$0$3.00
Joe Hawley$0$0$0$3$0$0$3.00
Roddy White$0$0$2$1$0-$1$2.00
Justin Blalock$0$0$0$2$0$0$2.00
Peter Konz$0$0$0$2$0$0$2.00
Darius Johnson$0$0$1$0$1$0$2.00
Jason Snelling$0$0$0$0$1$0$1.00
Harland Gunn$0$0$0$0.5$0$0$0.50
Levine Toilolo$0$0$0-$1$0$0-$1.00
Ryan Schraeder$0$0$0-$0.5$0-$1-$1.50
Lamar Holmes$0$0$0-$2$0-$3-$5.00

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Moneyball 2013 – Week 13 Review

December 10th, 2013 Comments off

Sorry for the delay in posting this, I was traveling last week for my day job and procrastinated over the weekend which prevented me from watching the All-22 of the Bills game until this morning. It shouldn’t happen again.

The big takeaway from this game was how aggressive the Falcons were offensively. They took multiple shots down the field, with 11 passes thrown beyond 15 yards and four passes thrown beyond 20 yards. That included four deep throws in the first half, which is a significant increase from previous weeks where the Falcons typically only started to throw down the field after they got behind in games in the second half.

Matt Ryan was able to hit those deep shots to Roddy White, who was able to make contested catches in traffic. I noticed quite a bit how little separation all of the Falcons receivers were able to get against the Bills defensive backs. But White and Tony Gonzalez, to a lesser extent, were able to make those grabs while Harry Douglas was not. This was a very frustrating watch in regards to Douglas, who just seems unable to make any grabs in traffic or whenever he is asked to extend away from his body. The notion that he and Ryan have a strong rapport, judging from this game alone, sounds ridiculous. For a pair of players that have been playing together for five years, Ryan doesn’t seem to ever be able to put the ball in the “sweet spot” where Douglas may be able to catch it like he seemingly does with his other targets. It’s like the conversation they have walking back to the huddle after another incomplete pass is this:

Ryan: “I thought you were going to dive/jump/extend for that one.”
Douglas: “Oh sorry, I didn’t know.”

Although the argument I’d probably make is that there isn’t a sweet spot for Douglas.

It’s going to be so laughable a year from now when the Falcons are overpaying Douglas when Darius Johnson is perfectly capable of filling his role for one-seventh the cost. If you’re going to pay someone to struggle to make contested catches in traffic, might as well pay 14 cents as opposed to a dollar.

Douglas really botched up that late scoring drive in the fourth quarter with his penalty for removing the helmet of Aaron Williams on a block, but got gifted a pass interference call on Nickell Robey on the next play. Yes, Robey was grabbing him, but it was incidental contact (tangling of the feet) that prevented Douglas from coming back to the ball rather than the “hand checking” that Robey was doing. It was a gift of a call, so you can’t always say that the refs are out to get the Falcons.

About the only positive I can say about Douglas is that he could have scored on that screen in overtime had Justin Blalock made the block against Leodis McKelvin.

The pass protection wasn’t great, but they gave Ryan enough time to make several of the throws he needed. Jeremy Trueblood and Peter Konz really struggled in the second half, giving up multiple hurries. I penalized Ryan on the sack where he tripped, although it was Konz that stepped on his foot. Lamar Holmes had early struggles, with Jerry Hughes and the other Bills ends giving him particularly problems with their speed. Holmes just appeared to be stuck in molasses as there was just neither explosiveness to his movements nor power in his punches. Joe Hawley also did not have a good game, although most of his struggles came when he was matched up against a Bills nose tackle (either Marcell Dareus or Alan Branch), similar to Todd McClure over the years. But there were also a couple of breakdowns in the protections, as a couple of times Bills defenders were able to come unblocked because someone missed an assignment (the first sack by Manny Lawson, and later sack by Corbin Bryant) were two good examples of that. That wasn’t reminiscent of McClure from yesteryear, as the Falcons rarely had such breakdowns due to missed assignments. Breakdowns in the past were simply because guys got beat.

Blalock was the only lineman that I would say played well, although he was credited with 1.5 sacks. One of which was due to a stunt by Hughes, that I split between him and Holmes, mainly because Holmes whiffed and when Blalock tried to clean up his mess, he also missed the block. If I was being technical, I’d probably say that play was 75 percent Holmes’ fault. His other sack came when Bryant came unblocked between him and Holmes, and I think it was a blown assignment as Blalock blocked the inside man. It’s just a guess, but I think that was probably more on Hawley for confusion on what the protection was than Blalock messing up.

PLAYER
PASS
RUSH
REC
BLK
SPEC
PEN
TOTALS
Matt Ryan$12$3$0$0$0-$2$13.00
Steven Jackson$0$12$0$0$0$0$12.00
Roddy White$0$0$7$0$0$0$7.00
Tony Gonzalez$0$0$5$0$0$0$5.00
Jacquizz Rodgers$0$2$2$0$0$0$4.00
Antone Smith$0$4-$1$0$1$0$4.00
Harry Douglas$0$1$4$0$0-$2$3.00
Justin Blalock$0$0$0$1.5$0$0$1.50
Darius Johnson$0$0$1$0$0$0$1.00
Jason Snelling$0$0$1$0$0$0$1.00
Levine Toilolo$0$0$1$0$0$0$1.00
Jeremy Trueblood$0$0$0$1$0$0$1.00
Patrick DiMarco$0$0$0$0$0$0$0.00
Joe Hawley$0$0$0$0$0$0$0.00
Peter Konz$0$0$0$0$0$0$0.00
Ryan Schraeder$0$0$0$0$0-$1-$1.00
Lamar Holmes$0$0$0-$1.5$0-$1-$2.50

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Falcons Midseason Superlatives 2013: Most Valuable Players

November 6th, 2013 Comments off
Josh D. Weiss-US PRESSWIRE

Matt Bosher

It’s time to look at some of the performances of the first half of the 2013 Atlanta Falcons season now that we’ve reached the midpoint. Here are my picks for which players stood out to earn some of these superlative awards.

For this first part, we’ll just focus on the most valuable players in the three phases of the game: offense, defense, and special teams.

Offensive MVP: Matt Ryan

Given the dropoff in production from the Falcons offense since the bye week, one could make an argument that Julio Jones is the most valuable player. But I figured picking him would be far too cynical a choice.

While Ryan’s performance has dropped off the past two weeks, overall he’s played at a high level. The hope is that his performance will bounce back in the second half once he gets a healthy Roddy White back to throw to.

Outside Ryan, Jones, and tight end Tony Gonzalez, there haven’t been many standout performances on the offensive side of the ball. The reality is that without Ryan, this Falcon team would be where Tampa Bay sits: winless and in utter disarray. Relative to most years, the Falcons wouldn’t be called stable this year, but what stability they do have is propped on Ryan’s shoulders.

Defensive MVP: William Moore

In past years, it always seemed like this was John Abraham or Sean Weatherspoon’s award. Well, neither player is still in contention since Abraham was released in the off-season and Weatherspoon has been injured for the majority of the first half of the year.

That means the mantle has passed to Moore for this top defensive honor. Moore hasn’t always been great, but he’s been the player on defense that has been the most consistently good.

The reality is that given how poorly the defense has played this year, there isn’t one player that has really played well. There have just been a mix of solid and mediocre performances. Moore has created a few turnovers, been a force against the run, and been effective in coverage through this season. Overall, the balance tips in his favor more than others.

Special Teams MVP: Matt Bosher

Perhaps it is because the standards have changed in regards to punter Matt Bosher that I’m tentative to give him this award. The “new normal” for Bosher is being a good punter, and thus his play has not really stood out to me this year as compared to a year ago.

I thought about going with gunners Antone Smith or Robert Alford due to their solid play in coverage. But in the end, I still have to give the honors to Bosher, while Smith and Alford deserve honorable mentions.

Bosher’s big leg has helped the Falcons special teams be effective nearly every game in the first half of the season by helping flip field position. While the team has struggled in the other phases of the game, the special teams has become a strength, thanks in large part to Bosher’s consistent play.

And the swagger also helps.

Categories: Features Tags: , , ,

Training Camp: Day 13 Report

August 11th, 2013 Comments off

Today represents the team’s final day of training camp open to the public. The Falcons won’t actually break camp until next weekend. After a day off following the team’s preseason loss to the Cincinnati Bengals, the Falcons returned to practice on Saturday. Here is what was reported:

  • Jay Adams took over for Daniel Cox in highlighted five takeaways from Saturday’s practice. Those include Paul Worrilow’s Thursday night performance against the Bengals, Julio Jones’ return to practice, the play of the Falcons young corners, as well as thoughts from Asante Samuel and Kroy Biermann.
  • Robert James was held out of practice, presumably due to an undisclosed injury he suffered in Thursday night’s matchup that limited him to only five snaps.
  • It appears the Falcons are trying to figure out ways to get both Jacquizz Rodgers and Steven Jackson on the field at the same time:

  • The official site posted Mike Smith’s transcript from his post-practice interview. Smith highlighted the two rookie corners, Matt Bosher, Lamar Holmes and Ryan Schraeder. Also spoke on Peter Konz’s play and Brian Banks’ progress. He also mentioned that newly signed offensive tackle Jeff Nady will get work at right tackle.

Bengals take down Falcons in opener

August 9th, 2013 Comments off
Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports

Dominique Davis gets chased by a Bengals defender

The Falcons continued their preseason struggles of recent seasons with a 34-10 loss to Cincinnati Bengals in the Georgia Dome. The Falcons held a 3-0 lead until the reserves stepped into the game late in the first quarter. But the backups struggled to move the ball and gave up too many big plays to allow the Bengals to win big.

Matt Ryan led the way with a solid performance, completing 6 of 9 passes for 89 yards before he was pulled in the first quarter after three series. Dominique Davis did the brunt of the remaining work and got off to a slow start. But he finished fairly well and had 8 of 19 completions for 78 yards with a touchdown and interception. Sean Renfree mopped up, completing 2 of 4 passes for 20 yards. On the ground, Steven Jackson kicked things off with 5 carries for 8 yards. Ronnie Wingo led rushers with 29 yards on 4 carries late in the game. Jason Snelling added 23 yards on 5 carries himself. He also led receivers with 3 catches for 21 yards and the Falcons’ lone offensive touchdown. Drew Davis, Darius Johnson, and Chase Coffman each had a pair of receptions for 53, 27, and 12 yards respectively. Harry Douglas had one catch for 42 yards to highlight the rest of the receivers in a game that saw minimal work from Roddy White and none from Julio Jones and Tony Gonzalez. Matt Bryant connected on his lone field goal try from 37 yards. Matt Bosher got a lot of usage due to the offensive struggles, punting 7 times for an average of 47.9 yards with 2 placed inside the 20-yard line. Harry Douglas had one punt return for 11 yards, and Robert Alford returned one for 2 yards. Jacquizz Rodgers, Josh Vaughan, and Levine Toilolo each returned one kickoff for 24, 21, and 12 yards respectively. Collectively, the Falcons offense gained 268 total yards and converted a modest 5 of 13 tries (33%) on third down.

Defensively, the Falcons gave up 434 total yards and allowed the Bengals to convert 9 of 16 third downs (56%). The Bengals chewed up the Falcons with 230 yards on the ground thanks in part to a team-leading 64 from quarterback Josh Johnson. But they also gave up three plays of 20-plus yards in the air as well. Paul Worrilow stood out with a team-leading 11 stops on defense. Pat Schiller had 5 tackles with Jonathan Massaquoi tallying 3 tackles, 1 sack, and a pair of QB hits. Robert Alford also had an impressive debut with 3 tackles and 2 passes defended. Other notable defenders include Joplo Bartu (3 tackles); Kemal Ishmael (3 tackles); Stansly Maponga (2 tackle, 1 QB hit); Zeke Motta (3 tackles); Adam Replogle (3 tackles); and Desmond Trufant (3 tackles). Among starters Osi Umenyiora only had a tackle, but was able to provide some pressure off the edge before being pulled. Special teams also gave up a 71-yard touchdown return on a punt by Dane Sanzenbacher. Worrilow was among six Falcon defenders that had a stop on special teams.

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Categories: News Tags: , , , , ,

Camp Battles 2013: Special Teams

July 23rd, 2013 1 comment

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Robert Alford could man both return spots this year

The Falcons brought in a pair of undrafted specialists in Jeremy Shelley and Sean Sellwood to push kicker Matt Bryant and punter Matt Bosher, respectively. Both are longshots and unless Bryant or Bosher get hurt really don’t stand much of a chance to make the roster.

Instead both will be competing in the hopes that it may impress another NFL team that could pick them up at the end of the summer off waivers. If either of them offer much potential for the Falcons it’s Shelley. Matt Bryant is signed through the 2014 season, but is already 38 years old. He’s been highly productive for the Falcons since joining the team late in 2009, but age eventually always catches up. Jason Elam was also solid for the Falcons until he turned 39 that same season, and his inconsistency prompted the team replace him with Bryant. So in reality if Shelley can have an impressive summer, he could be on speed dial in case there is any dropoff from Bryant in the near future. Shelley was one of the more accurate kickers in college football the past few years while at Alabama, specializing on short field goals. He’ll have to prove that he has NFL-caliber leg strength however.

Like Bosher, Sellwood possesses a big leg, but really is just insurance. Bosher struggled throughout his rookie season in 2011, but emerged as one of the top young punters with a much more consistent 2012 season. Sellwood really is only around in case Bosher regresses, which isn’t likely.

Long snapper Josh Harris had a bit of a rocky rookie season, but the Falcons didn’t bring in any direct competition for him. Assuming he doesn’t regress this summer, he should be a lock to retain his spot.

The big battle at this position group will be for the returner positions. Jacquizz Rodgers returned kickoffs last year, while Dominique Franks managed punts. Rodgers was effective at times in his role, but Franks was not. More than likely the Falcons would prefer another young player to emerge at either spot. However, the likelihood that Rodgers has a decreased role on offense due to the presence of Steven Jackson, means that he may better handle return duties. But in reality, he’s probably only going to open the season as the kickoff returner if no one else emerges.

The best candidate may be second round pick Robert Alford. While Alford primarily returned punts in college, his skillset may be better suited to returning kicks due to his excellent straight-line speed. In a perfect world, Alford will take over at both spots and give the Falcons a big play element that has been missing since the heyday of Allen Rossum. He’ll be competing with a number of other potential candidates.

Tim Toone, while not a big play threat as a punt returner, showed last summer that he can be somewhat reliable when it comes to consistently getting yardage. That is a valuable trait in that role and lacking that ability was one of the biggest reasons why Franks struggled last year. Undrafted rookies Rashad Evans and Darius Johnson both offer explosive speed and return experience from college. James Rodgers, Jacquizz’s brother nearly won a spot last summer and if he can improve upon that he is a prime candidate to win one of the spots.

Antone Smith and Harry Douglas also might be in the mix as they have return experience, but really are only options of last resort if no one else emerges.

Ranking the Falcons: No. 17 Matt Bosher

July 20th, 2013 1 comment
Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Matt Bosher

The 17th-ranked Falcon player is punter Matt Bosher. Click here to read the scoring system that devised these rankings.

Total Score: 61

Player Grade: 60 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 16 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 16 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 16 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +5
Positional Bonus: +2

These rankings don’t really discriminate against specialists. Bosher is ranked fairly high because he’s a young, ascending player. After a dismal start to his career as a rookie in 2011, Bosher has really developed into one of the team’s more consistent players. He consistently showcases a strong leg as a punter, and if the Falcons can get a bit more consistency from their coverage units his production would be better.

Bosher has a big leg that can routinely help the Falcons flip field position. Of 12 punts made last year where the Falcons were backed up inside their own 20-yard line, 7 of them went for 50 or more yards. Bosher also displays his big leg on kickoffs, ranking tied for sixth in the league with 45 touchbacks.

Bosher certainly has room for growth in both areas. The growth he’s already shown in his short two-year career is immense, and if he has comparable growth over his next two years, he could be potentially considered among the best punters in the league by the time his first contract runs out.

Categories: Features Tags: ,

Falcons Needs: Special Teams

February 14th, 2013 Comments off

The Falcons won’t be making many major changes here. Their primary goal, if any, at this position group will be upgrading their ability in the return game. The team lost Eric Weems last off-season, and their in-house replacements for him did not suffice.

Jacquizz Rodgers was a competent kickoff returner at times, but if he is going to carve a larger role on offense, they should have another player that can play here. If the Falcons do add a wide receiver or cornerback this off-season, it would make a lot of sense to find one that can also return kicks.

Dominique Franks struggled throughout the year to make any impact as the team’s punt returner. He was replaced late in the year by Harry Douglas, who did very little in his brief time. At this point, finding a competent punt returner would appear to be the biggest priority.

The Falcons probably will let players like Tim Toone and James Rodgers get opportunities to win either job next summer. But it makes sense to bring in more competition if possible via a free agent signing, a mid or late round draft pick, or do what the Falcons did a year ago and target a number of undrafted players that have return and special teams experience.

As for the other specialist positions, besides bringing another camp body there is no need there. Kicker Matt Bryant still seems to be going strong. His leg strength isn’t what it once was, but inside the Georgia Dome he’s about as good a kicker as they come. Punter Matt Bosher showed improvement in his sophomore season. Bosher’s big leg has the potential to really affect field position. He’s also a very good kickoff specialist.

Long snapper Josh Harris had a couple of miscues during his rookie season, but for the most part was solid to good. If any one of the three specialist deserve competition, it would be him, but it’s not really necessary. Other than that, the Falcons might want to kick the tires on an undrafted kicker just to get a look-see at the young talent that is out there given Bryant’s increasing age. Bryant turns 38 in May and has two more years left on his contract.

The teams’ coverage units took a step back in 2012 due to the absences of Weems and Akeem Dent, who were the team’s best cover guys in 2011. Dent got more work on coverage towards the end of the year. The team still has solid performers with players like Kroy Biermann, Jason Snelling, Antone Smith, Drew Davis, Robert James, and Chris Owens. Healthy seasons from players such as Bradie Ewing, Kerry Meier, and/or Shann Schillinger could also improve the unit. Jonathan Massaquoi and Cliff Matthews flashed ability as well late in the year, and the team needs to get a greater contribution from Charles Mitchell, who will be replacing Chris Hope in all likelihood as the top reserve at safety. Overall, the Falcons coverage was more than capable last year. If the Falcons target reserves at wide receiver, linebacker, or in the secondary this off-season, you can be sure they will be expected to contribute in this arena as well.