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Posts Tagged ‘draft’

Final 2014 Mock NFL Draft

May 7th, 2014 Comments off
Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

Jake Matthews

Initially I intended to have my final mock draft to include trades, but it wound being much too complicated in the end and I abandoned it. But some of these picks reflect some possible trades as opposed to the exact position in which I think guys will go.

1. Houston – DE Jadeveon Clowney, South Carolina
2. St. Louis – OT Greg Robinson, Auburn
3. Jacksonville – QB Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M
4. Cleveland – WR Sammy Watkins, Clemson
5. Oakland – LB Khalil Mack, Buffalo
6. Atlanta – OT Jake Matthews, Texas A&M
7. Tampa Bay – WR Mike Evans, Texas A&M
8. Minnesota – LB Anthony Barr, UCLA
9. Buffalo – DT Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh
10. Detroit – OT Taylor Lewan, Michigan
11. Tennessee – QB Blake Bortles, Central Florida
12. N.Y. Giants – OT Zack Martin, Notre Dame
13. St. Louis – CB Kyle Fuller, Virginia Tech
14. Chicago – S Hasean Clinton-Dix, Alabama
15. Pittsburgh – CB Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State
16. Dallas – S Calvin Pryor, Louisville
17. Baltimore – TE Eric Ebron, North Carolina
18. N.Y. Jets – WR Odell Beckham, LSU
19. Miami – CB Justin Gilbert, Oklahoma State
20. Arizona – DT Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota
21. Green Bay – LB Ryan Shazier, Ohio State
22. Philadelphia – WR Marqise Lee, Southern California
23. Kansas City – WR Brandin Cooks, Oregon State
24. Cincinnati – CB Bradley Roby, Ohio State
25. San Diego - OT Joel Bitonio, Nevada
26. Cleveland – QB Teddy Bridgewater, Louisville
27. New Orleans – CB Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Nebraska
28. Carolina – OT Morgan Moses, Virginia
29. New England – OG Xavier Su’a-Filo, UCLA
30. San Francisco - CB Jason Verrett, Texas Christian
31. Denver – LB C.J. Mosley, Alabama
32. Seattle – DE Demarcus Lawrence, Boise State

 

Categories: Draft Central Tags: ,

FalcFans Podcast – Ep. 65 “Last Thoughts on the Draft”

May 6th, 2014 Comments off

I am joined by Dave Choate of the Falcholic to give some final thoughts on what the Atlanta Falcons could do in the 2014 NFL Draft. We break down several first-round scenarios for the Falcons including whether or not they will trade up for Jadeveon Clowney or stay at six to take an offensive tackle. We also discuss what areas of need could be targeted in the second and third rounds of the draft. Then we follow up with our assessment of which areas could be addressed in the later rounds. We also discuss whether Bear Pascoe’s signing will affect the Falcons draft plans at tight end.

Episode 65 – Last Thoughts on the Draft [Download]

Duration: 48 minutes

Dave writes for The Falcoholic and can be found on twitter: @TheFalcoholic.

If you have any questions and comments, you can hit us up on Twitter, post in the forums in the podcast thread, or drop an e-mail at: pudge@falcfans.com.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, and be sure to rate us there! You can also subscribe directly to our feed at the following URL: http://feeds.feedburner.com/falcfans/LXSt

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Takeaways from Last Week – May 5, 2014

May 5th, 2014 Comments off
Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

Clowney, Clowney, Clowney, Clowney

Only a few more days until the 2014 NFL Draft and the wait is agonizing.

The draft was moved back two weeks this year due to the fact that Radio City Music Hall, the draft’s permanent home since 2006, was hosting an Easter celebration the weekend that the draft normally happens. That show was subsequently cancelled.

But I heard a year ago on Rich Eisen’s podcast that a May draft has always been the goal of the NFL because it will better mesh with sweeps weeks to bolster ratings and subsequently advertising dollars.

Will the draft move back to late April next year? Who knows? The fact that the league is mulling over expanding the draft to four days from three indicates that fan feedback isn’t what is driving their decision making. Almost no one likes the extra two weeks of waiting and the idea of a four-day format just sounds exhausting.

The three-day format is already long enough. While the opening night is exciting, any fervor is dramatically reduced by the time the third day rolls around and you’re about a round or two into the draft.

Adding another day would be akin to pulling teeth by the time the seventh round rolls around on either Saturday or Sunday.

But again, feedback isn’t driving the bus. Fans and media personalities can moan and decry a four-day May draft, but it’s not going to stop them from watching. It’s certainly not going to stop me.

I can’t remember the last time I did not watch the entirety of the draft from start to finish. I just can’t get enough of it.

This year will probably be the first time in many years where I won’t thanks to my sister-in-law graduating from grad school this Saturday. That will consume much of my afternoon. But if I had a choice about supporting her or just mindlessly watching as players I’ve never heard of get drafted in the fifth round on Saturday, I’d choose the latter.

Ultimately, until fans are willing to turn off their television sets when it comes to the draft, there is going to be no incentive for the league itself to not keeping going down this path. Eventually, the draft could be in June and last a full seven days, one per round, and it would still likely be the highest-rated television event for that week.

But I can’t wait for Thursday and Friday night this week as the 2014 NFL Draft will finally be upon us. I’ve gotten fatigue in writing about what the Falcons will do week after week, and most of it involving the decision to trade up for South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney.

Will the best defensive prospect in years wind up a Falcon? That has been the big question of the offseason, and it seems that everything they’ve done so far will be easily eclipsed if the answer is yes.

Read more…

Categories: Features Tags: , , , ,

FalcFans Weekly – May 4, 2014

May 4th, 2014 Comments off
Getty Images from Yahoo! Sports

Julio Jones

Here are some of the more interesting reads from the past week involving the Atlanta Falcons:

Dave Choate writes about making peace with the draft class. I agree, serenity is the path to salvation. I may not ultimately agree with every selection the Falcons make come draft day, but I still tend to give them all the benefit of the doubt. The draft is such a crapshoot, and which players actually work out versus those that don’t is too much of an unknown to be overly positive or negative towards the picks.

Generally, my reaction to every pick is one of the following three:

  1. “Wow, I love this player! I hope he lives up to his potential.”
  2. “Alright, he’s a decent player. I hope he lives up to his potential.”
  3. “Meh, I’m not in love with this player. I hope he lives up to his potential.”

Notice the common thread in all of those reactions, since those things are really unknown. But all that is involved is the hope that a player stays healthy and goes on to have a successful NFL career.

***

Now that Julio Jones is locked up through 2015, the next step is getting a contract extension signed according to ESPN’s Vaughn McClure. McClure writes that it’s possible that a long-term deal for Jones could average around $11-12 million per year. I think that is very much an underestimation when all things are said and done. If Jones signs for less than $14 million/yr, I will be shocked. It might even exceed $16 million annually, matching the two biggest contracts for wide receivers currently in the league: Calvin Johnson and Larry Fitzgerald.
Read more…

Categories: Features Tags: , , , ,

Falcons Pro Day Round-Up 5/4

May 4th, 2014 Comments off

Pro days have long been over, however that doesn’t mean that there wasn’t any Atlanta Falcons-related draft news from the past week.

The National Football Post revealed that the Falcons have shown interest in a number of players including Florida State fullback Chad Abram, Buffalo cornerback Najja Johnson, Vanderbilt wide receiver Chris Boyd and Louisville safety Hakeem Smith.

All four players are projected to be late-round picks and possibly undrafted free agent candidates.

Boyd is interesting given some of his off-field concerns that led to him being kicked off Vanderbilt’s team last summer. The Falcons’ interest in him could be due to them trying to gain more insight into those events, but also because the team has already done the background work that wouldn’t preclude them selecting him if he’s already passed their strict character filter.

Categories: Draft Central Tags: , ,

Draft Needs: Is Dwight Lowery Enough for Falcons at Safety?

May 2nd, 2014 Comments off
Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports

Dwight Lowery

When the Atlanta Falcons decided to cut long-time free safety Thomas DeCoud in March, it created a void at the position. But the thinking may have been that DeCoud’s play in 2013 had slipped so considerably that such a void would be relatively easy to fill.

And while the Falcons made quick moves to help address their weaknesses along the line of scrimmage at the outset of free agency, they stood quiet when it came to concerns in the secondary. But eventually the Falcons addressed their need at the position by signing Dwight Lowery, formerly of the Jacksonville Jaguars.

Lowery was a forgotten man, having missed most of 2013 nursing a concussion. He was released by the Jaguars midseason after being placed on injured reserve due to that head injury, his second in six years in the NFL. But his inconspicuous exit from Jacksonville should not diminish what he had done for three years, where he was second only to linebacker Daryl Smith as the team’s most consistent defender. And one certainly saw what Smith did in Baltimore last year after leaving behind obscurity in Jacksonville.

Lowery began his career at cornerback, playing three seasons with the New York Jets playing mainly in the slot. That should give him an edge over DeCoud in terms of coverage on the back-end, an area that has been sorely lacking for the team in recent years. Man coverage is anything but a strength for strong safety William Moore (as Jimmy Graham can attest). Not to mention, Lowery should be a vast improvement over DeCoud in run support as he is much less prone to missing tackles. Over the past three years in Jacksonville, Lowery missed a combined 10 tackles (per premium website Pro Football Focus). In 2013 alone, DeCoud missed 12 and combined for 43 over the past three seasons.

Read more…

Draft Needs: Are Falcons Desperately Seeking an Edge-Rusher?

April 30th, 2014 Comments off
Kelley L Cox-USA TODAY Sports

Jonathan Massaquoi

If you’re making a case for what is the Atlanta Falcons biggest draft need, it starts and ends with edge pass-rusher.

The lack of a significant pass rush has plagued the team for multiple seasons. The last time the team finished in the top 15 league-wide in sacks was 2008, and the last time they finished in the top 10 was in 2004 when they led the entire league with 48 sacks.

Frankly, the Falcons wasted the talents of John Abraham for the seven years he played in Atlanta as they were never able to surround him with a good enough supporting cast to create a consistently effective pass rush. The Falcons have watched team after team tee off on Matt Ryan over the past few seasons, yet have rarely done the same to opposing quarterbacks. It is long overdue that changes.

Thus, it was disappointing when the team opted to not make any major moves during free agency to improve the pass rush. Instead the team focused their attention on adding run defenders like Paul Soliai and Tyson Jackson along with retaining the likes of Jonathan Babineaux, Corey Peters and Peria Jerry. While the latter three are solid players, they are simply part of the pass-rush-deficient problem that has plagued the team for multiple years.

So things now turn to the draft where the Falcons must find a way to improve the league’s worst third-down defense.

However that puts a lot of pressure on a rookie pass-rusher to essentially carry the unit, even if said rookie isas gifted as South Carolina’s Jadeveon Clowney.

But any rookie will get help from the likes of Jonathan Massaquoi, Kroy Biermann, Osi Umenyiora and Stansly Maponga. The Falcons are retaining their hybrid scheme, but may play with “more 3-4 flavor” than previously under defensive coordinator Mike Nolan.

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Draft Needs: More Beef Needed on Falcons Defensive Interior?

April 30th, 2014 1 comment
Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports

Malliciah Goodman

An offseason priority for the Atlanta Falcons was “toughening up” their team, with an emphasis on bulking up on both lines of scrimmage. The team did just that when they opened up free agency by signing defensive tackle Paul Soliai and defensive end Tyson Jackson.

For many, it signaled that the Falcons were moving to a 3-4 scheme. Why else would would they guarantee $25 million to players that have spent the bulk of their careers playing in that defensive scheme? While Falcons defensive coordinator Mike Nolan has coached both 4-3 and 3-4 defenses, prior to his arrival in Atlanta he had not coached a defense with a 4-3 as their base scheme in seven years. Nolan’s history signaled a clear preference for the 3-4 defense, and the signings of Soliai and Jackson appeared to be that preference finally coming to fruition in Atlanta after two years of a hybrid unit between the two schemes.

But Falcons head coach Mike Smith was quick to pump the brakes on those expectations, indicating that the team would still be utilizing a hybrid scheme. That makes sense given the team opted to bring back free agents Jonathan Babineaux, Corey Peters and Peria Jerry, who all were drafted by the Falcons originally to play in a 4-3 scheme.

Although it’s interesting that between the three of them, they are making less than $5 million in guaranteed money. So if money talks, then the Falcons will be tailoring their defense more towards the strengths of Jackson and Soliai, which should indicate more 3-4 “flavor” than 4-3 in their hybrid unit in 2014.

That should help a player like Malliciah Goodman, who has the ability to play in either scheme, but may project best in a 3-4 at defensive end. Goodman flashed good ability as a run defender as a rookie last year, and has reportedly bulked up considerably this offseason with the mindset of becoming a regular in the team’s base defense.

That development should benefit a player like Babineaux, who was the team’s top pass-rusher a year ago despite having a single sack. Per Moneyball game reviews which focus on All-22, Babineaux led the team with 13 “positive pass rushes,” which are sacks, quarterback hits and pressures combined. Babineaux also played the most of any Falcon defensive lineman last year with 924 snaps according to premium website Pro Football Focus. Only William Moore (1,064 snaps) and Desmond Trufant (1,022) played more on defense. Babineaux’s reps were the fourth-most of any interior defensive lineman in the league in 2013, and frankly way too much for a 32-year old player.

Goodman missed two games due to injury last season, but wound up playing 305 snaps. If he can carve a bigger role in the rotation, particularly on run downs, it will allow the team to streamline Babineaux’s playing time on passing downs. That could potentially cut his snap count in half, and thus keep him fresher for this year and give him a better chance to play out the remainder of what is expected to be his final NFL contract.

Read more…

Draft Needs: Are Falcons Okay at Center?

April 29th, 2014 Comments off

The Atlanta Falcons seemingly solidified their center position by re-signing free agent Joe Hawley this offseason.

But the interesting thing about Hawley’s contract is that it is a significant commitment to the fifth-year pro, but also not really a commitment to him.

If Hawley doesn’t have a strong 2014 season, the team could move on from him rather easily in 2015 based off how his contract is structured. In 2015, the metaphorical keys could easily be tossed over to Peter Konz at center, when he could play out the final year of his contract in order to be given the opportunity to earn a second. At this point, it would seem Konz is unlikely to get a substantial second deal with the team in 2016, but that could change if he shows growth and development over the next year or two.

Given the added presence of Harland Gunn on the roster, the Falcons appear three-deep potentially at the center position. More than likely, they’ll let the competition between Hawley and Konz play out this year without bringing any major addition into the mix. They’ll certainly add at least one more body in undrafted free agency, but drafting a player seems doubtful.

Based off how Hawley and Konz performed this upcoming season, the Falcons could then determine if center is going to be a priority position in the 2015 offseason. The less faith Hawley or Konz instill in them this year, the more likely the team will go out of its way to upgrade the position next year.

Categories: Draft Central Tags: , , ,

Draft Needs: Do Falcons Really Need Upgrade at Tackle?

April 29th, 2014 1 comment

Offensive tackle was a position that plagued the Atlanta Falcons throughout the 2013 season, and has been one long designated as an area that could use improvement.

So the answer to the question of whether the team needs an upgrade at the position in yes. But a better question may be, does the team need to use a high pick in order to make that upgrade? Particularly when looking at the right tackle spot where Lamar Holmes is expected to line up.

Holmes struggled throughout most of 2013, but there were points during the season where he was decent when he was filling in for an injured Sam Baker at left tackle. There was a seven-game stretch between Weeks 4 and 11, where Holmes only allowed one sack and four pressures according to Moneyball reviews. That sort of production over the course of an entire 16-game season would indicate that Holmes is more than capable of holding down a starting job permanently.

The premium at the offensive tackle position comes on the left side, with NFL teams investing considerably more in their left tackles than they do in their right ones. Looking at the grades on premium website Pro Football Focus, I looked at all the tackles that played at least 500 snaps in 2013 and broke them down based on what round they were drafted in. I then also looked at those who finished the season with a positive grade according to PFF’s metrics as they appear in the following tables under the “Good” category. Here’s how left tackles and right tackles broke down separately:

Left Tackles by Round

Round
Total
Pct.
Good
Pct.
1st1544%1362%
2nd618%314%
3rd39%00%
4th39%15%
5th00%00%
6th00%00%
7th26%15%
Undrafted515%314%

Right Tackles by Round

Round
Total
Pct.
Good
Pct.
1st824%633%
2nd618%422%
3rd26%16%
4th26%211%
5th412%16%
6th00%00%
7th26%16%
Undrafted927%317%

The numbers clearly delineate how much more NFL teams invest in left tackles than right tackles, with nearly half the regulars at left tackle in 2013 being former first-round picks. They also show how that teams that invest high picks (first and second-rounders) in either position tends to pay dividends with better production. In both cases, more than 70 percent of the regular tackles on both sides that were first or second-round picks wound up receiving positive grades from Pro Football Focus. It became much more hit and miss thereafter.

It suggests that if the Falcons want to upgrade either tackle position, they would be smart to invest a first or second-round pick in them.

But the better question may not be whether the Falcons should invest a high pick in a right tackle to upgrade Holmes, but rather whether they should be looking to improve the left tackle position. Sam Baker has been anything but reliable over the past six years, missing a combined 26 games due to injury. That trend cannot continue, and a first-round pick at tackle could go a long way to address that problem.

But the Falcons invested a significant contract in Baker last offseason and are seemingly stuck with him for at least another season. If he doesn’t rebound this year, then the team may be forced to part ways with him next offseason. So the best strategy for the Falcons may be using a high pick on a player that can be plugged in immediately at right tackle, but eventually move to the left side. That could give Holmes more time to develop and hone his skills. And also give the team a very good insurance policy in case Baker does not bounce back and have a good year in 2014.

The Falcons cannot cut Baker without eating a significant amount of dead money until 2016. But if a rookie tackle shows promise his first year, the team might decide to take that penalty and move on in 2015. The chances of that happen increase exponentially if the Falcons take a tackle in the first two rounds of this year’s draft.

Categories: Draft Central Tags: , , , ,